Banange. Just chill From.

I edited an article one time-a good portion of it was peppered with what I like to call poor ‘Froms’. The word ‘From’ was so ill-used that halfway through, I decided it wouldn’t do for me to fix it up and send it to print. I needed to make a difference in the world. I needed to make this writer a better person, praise Jesus.

jesus

The black one

So I called him up and offered them a cup of tea. I took him to a nice discreet place with enough foliage that we would have privacy as I took him back to school.

“You can’t do this man” I told him delicately, cradling my tea cup. “You can’t say the accident happened from here. You say the accident happened here. That’s it. Leave ‘From’ out”.

He set his lips resolutely.

“It’s Ugandan English”.

The consequence of that meeting-the heated debate and denial of wrong-doing from the writer-makes me feel like setting up an establishment. Call it “The institution dedicated to the eradication of the inappropriate use of the unfortunate word ‘From’”.

Below are a myriad of examples of how Ugandans like to use the word ‘From’.

“She gave birth from this place”.
“The accident happened from here”.
“The police caught the thief from where he had been stealing”.

Now please pay attention to how these three sentences actually sound correct when you remove the unnecessary ‘From’.

“She gave birth at or in this place.”
“The accident happened here.”
“The police caught the thief where he had been stealing.”

from

Aaaaaahhhh-all along! You mean…?

Yes! I see the cobwebs clearing from your eyes! You too have been silently nourishing niggling doubts as to the proper usage of this phrase!

If you really feel a need to make poor ‘From’ part and parcel of your sentences, please review the correct way the word is supposed to be employed.

“I come from Jamaica.”
“I was coming from this place when it happened.”
And because Valentine’s Day is around the corner…

“I love the sound of your voice. I want to hear more vowels and consonants issuing forth from your lips!”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s